love dolls real

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Women, especially when they get older, shit and stink, and when they shit anyway, and they enslave men, and are ugly, and they fuck around when they have the opportunity. No such problems with sex dolls, and they don't shit. Let's invest in a future without women.

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Fenton, Missouri: Check your tongkat ali source

Micah M. Reece 3345 Bruce Street Fenton, MO 63026

It’s hard for people in the US to buy genuine, effective tongkat ali.

Sure, herbal supplements are everywhere. But it’s not that you could walk into a shop of a chain supplement store, pick a bottle that has tongkat ali printed on it, and then be somebody who enhances the quality of his or her life by balancing hormonal factors.

Because the bottle which says tongkat ali is likely to either contain none of it, or just absolutely minimal, disregardable, therapeutically useless trace amounts of tongkat ali. A sand corn of tongkat ali in a truckload of rubbish. And that sand corn isn’t even extract, but root powder.

I have been saying this about major supplement brands present in US chain stores for two decades, and now it’s official.

As reported in the New York Times and subsequently in all kinds if other media, the New York attorney general has sent a warning lette to Walmart, Walgreens, Target, and GNC to remove that junk from there shelves, or face judicial proceedings.

If you want genuine tongkat ali extract, or even just genuine root, buy it from a source in Indonesia. Or buy from somebody who can prove, not just claim, that his or her tongkat ali is from a trustworthy source in Indonesia. If ever possible, avoid Singapore for tongkat ali or health supplements in general. You don’t want to mess up your health with bootleg white powders from a kitchen lab or garage lab in China. They don’t have scruples to poison infants, and they won’t stop before doing so with bodybuilders or sexual-thrill seekers. There is anyway no public sympathy for dirty old men who suffer a sudden exitus while being at it on top of a prostitute in a backlane absteige.

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Columbus, Ohio: The legality of sex dolls

Scott N. Fish 2722 James Martin Circle Columbus, OH 43215

The vibrator initially was a tool not so much for players, but for physicians. Psychiatrists, to be exact.

Some 200 years ago, the female orgasm was largely unknown in Western culture. Anyway, touching ones genitals was taboo, and the common medical and non-medical opinion was that masturbation would lead to mentak illness, and the institutionalization in psychiatric hospitals.

Back in those times, some psychiatrists specialized in treating upper class women. The preferred treatment was to induce a hysterical crisis by clitoral stimulation. What was named hysterical crisis is known nowadays as clitoral orgasm. And inducing it was manual work for psychiatrists. Before the vibrator was invented, that is. As a medical tool.

Until now, the sex toys industry has an important role to play in the health of people and societies.

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Los Angeles, California: From sex toys to works of art: ‘Love doll’ maker seeks to shed seedy image

Rudy R. Dixon 3140 Hillhaven Drive Los Angeles, CA 90017

Japan’s oldest “love doll” manufacturer wants to strip the sex toys of their seedy image and encourage people to see them as works of art instead.

“Even now there is still a stigma,” said Junpei Oguchi, a representative for Tokyo-based sex doll maker Orient Industry, which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary with a three-week exhibition showing the evolution of its dolls that drew over 10,000 visitors.

“But at our exhibition there were lots of men and women visitors — more women than men, in fact,” he said. “There were young and old, men and women, a really wide range of people. I think people came because they had heard the reputation of how beautiful our dolls are. We want to get rid of the stigma.”

Orient Industry was founded in 1977 by former sex shop owner Hideo Tsuchiya, who noticed that customers who had bought inflatable latex sex dolls from his store were returning to complain of punctures. Tsuchiya sold his shop and used the money to set up his own business with the aim of manufacturing a more durable product.

Orient Industry, which is based in Tokyo’s Ueno district and has a factory in Katsushika Ward, now employs 26 workers including makeup artists and face sculptors, many of whom are art school graduates.

The dolls range in price from ¥262,440 to ¥685,000, come with removable heads and genitals, and are strikingly lifelike in appearance. The silicone skin is soft to the touch, joints are fully flexible, and real human hair and other details further fleshes out the illusion of reality.

“When the company started, the dolls’ faces looked like mannequins’ faces,” said Oguchi. “Now we have staff who mold the faces and they are highly praised for the way they look.

“In 2001, we started using silicone to make the dolls. By doing that and by molding the faces and using makeup, we were able to make dolls that looked much more realistic than before. We were able to increase the quality by using better materials, and that was a big step forward for us.”

Noted photographers such as Laurie Simmons and Kishin Shinoyama have made the company’s dolls the subject of books and exhibitions, with the latter showing his work at Orient Industry’s anniversary event that ran from May 20 to June 11 at Shibuya’s Atsukobarouh gallery.

Oguchi believes that validation from the art world is helping to shift attitudes toward sex dolls.

“We get a lot of different customers,” he said. “Some are only interested in buying dolls for sex, some want to buy them so they can take photos of them, and some want to take them out and about with them. Some have blogs where they write about living with them.

“A lot of our customers are over 40 but we also have customers in their 20s. It can be expensive to hire models, so photographers can use them for their pictures. We also have customers who buy them to use in shop displays.”

A survey released in February by the Japan Family Planning Association revealed that sexlessness among married couples in Japan is on the rise, with almost half admitting to not having made love for more than a month.

A record 35.2 percent of men surveyed cited “exhaustion from work” as the biggest reason for their indifference to sex, while 22.3 percent of women described lovemaking as “a hassle.”

An estimated 2,000 sex dolls are sold in the country each year. Oguchi believes that many buyers are looking for comfort as much as physical gratification.

“People in Japan generally live for a long time and a lot of elderly men lose their wives to old age,” he said. “Men in their 70s or 80s whose wives have died may feel lonely. They have lost a friend.

“Those men might buy one of our dolls to make themselves feel better. I hear that a lot. Our dolls can be useful in that regard.”

But Orient Industry has also come under fire for producing a range of dolls that resemble children. The childlike dolls stand just 136 cm tall, and are pictured wearing school gym gear on the company’s website.

“In every country there are incidents where elementary school or junior high school children are sexually abused, and Japan is no different,” said Oguchi.

“Some people are sexually attracted only to them. We once had a customer who came in and all of a sudden he told us that he was only sexually attracted to children.

“Of course if you did anything to harm real children then you would be arrested. There would be real victims. So some people want to buy our products to use as an outlet. I think, in some ways, it can act as a deterrent.”

Orient Industry has an English-language website and receives orders from overseas. But the firm also faces global competition from a burgeoning industry looking to harness the latest technology in the service of sexual fantasy.

Dozens of companies in a “sex tech” industry worth an estimated $30 billion are developing dolls with features such as artificial intelligence, but Oguchi insists that Orient Industry is happy to follow its own path.

“Our love dolls are not robots,” he said. “Our aim is to make even better dolls. I have heard that there is a company in the Netherlands that uses AI in their dolls but they cost about ¥5 million each. Ordinary people can’t afford that.

“If you start to make robots that use AI, the price goes up. That isn’t something that our company is thinking about doing.”

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Kansas City, Missouri: Bizarre Japanese physio has fallen in love with a SEX DOLL who ‘doesn’t grumble’ – and forces long-suffering wife to live under the same roof

Joshua M. Kent 4315 Big Elm Kansas City, MO 64106

Masayuki, 45, said: “After my wife gave birth we stopped having sex and I felt a deep sense of loneliness.

“But the moment I saw Mayu in the showroom, it was love at first sight.

“My wife was furious when I first brought Mayu home. These days she puts up with it, reluctantly.

“When my daughter realised it wasn’t a giant Barbie doll, she freaked out and said it was gross — but now she’s old enough to share Mayu’s clothes.”

Masayuki, who works as a physio, takes his doll out on dates in a wheelchair and dresses her in wigs, sexy clothes and jewellery.

He admits to being turned off by human relationships, adding during a seaside stroll with his rubber companion: “Japanese women are cold-hearted.

“They’re very selfish. Men want someone to listen to them without grumbling when they get home from work.

“Whatever problems I have, Mayu is always there waiting for me. I love her to bits and want to be with her for ever.

“I can’t imagine going back to a human being. I want to be buried with her and take her to heaven.”

He is one of an increasing number of Japanese men turning to romantic relationships with sex dolls in a country that has officially lost its mojo.

Experts are worried by Japan‘s plummeting birth rate, which poses serious problems for the future of the economy as it faces a dwindling number of workers.

But a growing number of men — known as “herbivores” — are turning their backs on marriage and traditional masculine values for a quiet, uncompetitive life.

Every year around 2,000 of the life-like sex dolls — which cost from £4,600 and come with adjustable fingers, removable head and realistic genitals — are sold in Japan.

Hideo Tsuchiya, managing director of doll maker Orient Industry, said: “Technology has come a long way since those nasty inflatable dolls in the 1970s.

“They look incredibly real now and it feels like you’re touching human skin. More men are buying them because they feel they can actually communicate with the dolls.”

They are popular with disabled customers and widowers, as well as mannequin fetishists, and some men use dolls to avoid heartache.

Senji Nakajima, 62, tenderly bathes his rubber girlfriend Saori, has framed photos of her on his wall and even takes her skiing and surfing.

He said on a romantic picnic beneath a canopy of cherry blossom: “Human beings are so demanding. People always want something from you — like money or commitment.

“My heart flutters when I come home to Saori. She never betrays me, she makes my worries melt away.”

Senji’s romance with Saori has divided his family and his wife has banned her from the family home, but the Tokyo-born businessman refuses to give her up.

He said: “My son accepts it, my daughter can’t.

“I’ll never date a real woman again — they’re heartless.”

The doll sleeps in his bed in a cluttered apartment on the outskirts of Tokyo, sandwiched between two dolls from previous dalliances and a headless rubber torso.

He admits reconciliation with his estranged wife is unlikely, adding: “I wouldn’t be able to take a bath with Saori, or snuggle up with her and watch TV.

“I don’t want to destroy what I have with her.”

And while the pillow talk is decidedly one-way, Senji believes he has discovered true love.

He said: “I’d never cheat on her, even with a prostitute, because to me she’s human.”

Another doll lover is Yoshitaka Hyodo, whose home in Saitama is an Aladdin’s Cave of dolls, kitsch toys and Japanese erotica.

He lives alone but has an “understanding” girlfriend. She would have to be as he owns more than ten life-size dummies, many of which he dresses in combat uniform to play out wartime fantasies.

The 43-year-old blogger said: “In the future I think more and more guys will choose relationships with dolls.

“It’s less stress and they complain a lot less than women.”

But he claims to have cut down on having sex with dolls.

He said: “It’s more about connecting on an emotional level for me now.

“People might think I’m weird, but it’s no different from collecting sports cars. I don’t know how much I’ve spent but it’s cheaper than a Lamborghini.”

Future doll users can expect more bang for their buck as researchers are developing next-generation sexbots able to talk, laugh, simulate an orgasm — and even remember your birthday.

But for now, Masayuki’s long-suffering wife Riho tries hard to ignore the rubber temptress silently taunting her from her husband’s bedroom.

She said: “I just get on with the housework.

“I make the dinner, I clean, I do the washing. I choose sleep over sex.”

Last month we told how a Japanese fetish doll exhibition celebrating 40 years of the industry attracted hundreds of horny visitors.

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Rew, Pennsylvania: Japanese company manufactures lifelike child sex dolls for paedophiles

Matthew E. Snider 1242 Stutler Lane Rew, PA 16744

'I am helping people express their desires, legally and ethically. It’s not worth living if you have to live with repressed desire'

A Japanese company produces lifelike child sex dolls - claiming they prevent paedophiles from offending.

Shin Takagi has shipped anatomically-correct sex dolls of girls as young as five to clients around the world for more than a decade.

In an interview with The Atlantic, he described how he set up the Japense company Trottla because of his own attraction to children and his conviction they should be protected.

“We should accept that there is no way to change someone’s fetishes,” Mr Takagi said.

“I am helping people express their desires, legally and ethically. It’s not worth living if you have to live with repressed desire.”

Treatments for paedophilia exist, including cognitive-behavioural therapy and chemical castration, along with other interventions intended to suppress urges.

However, a meta-analysis by the Mayo Clinic found the treatments "do not change the paedophile's basic sexual orientation towards children".

Mr Takagi believes the dolls he creates - sent mostly to "men living alone" - save children from sexual abuse.

He said: “I often receive letters from buyers. The letters say, ‘Thanks to your dolls, I can keep from committing a crime.’”

"I hear statements like that from doctors, prep school teachers—even celebrities.”

Michael Seto, a psychologist and sexologist at the University of Toronto, told The Atlantic there were two different types of paedophiles.

Award for Louis Theroux documentary 'A Place for Paedophiles' He said: "For some paedophiles, access to artificial child pornography or to child sex dolls could be a safer outlet for their sexual urges, reducing the likelihood that they would seek out child pornography or sex with real children.

“For others, having these substitutes might only aggravate their sense of frustration.

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Staunton, Virginia: After long wait, Japan moves to ban possession of child pornography

Steven C. Wright 843 Maxwell Farm Road Staunton, VA 24401

In most of Japan, it's still legal to possess child pornography. Although production and distribution have been banned for 15 years, Japan lags behind other major developed nations in forbidding people from simply holding the sinister material.

That is about to change in a country regarded as a global nexus of child pornography. The country's upper house of parliament is expected to pass legislation this month making possession of it a crime punishable by up to a year in prison.

Children's rights activists have applauded the step, although their reaction is tempered with frustration that it has taken such a long time.

"As a member of a group that's been hearing the voice of the victims for many years, we welcome the news," said Shihoko Fujiwara, a representative of Lighthouse, a nonprofit group that helps exploited children. "Japan took so long, and it is too late to reach this decision as a developed country."

The proposed law, which was already approved by the lower house of parliament this week, comes with a couple of noteworthy loopholes. When it goes into effect, it will give those already in possession of child pornography a year to dispose of it.

And it won't cover the country's popular manga (comic book) and anime (animation) industries, which include depictions of violent sexual abuse of children in their publications.

Fujiwara said a discussion about some of the imagery in manga and anime -- content that would be illegal in many Western countries -- would be a natural "next step."

'A necessary evil'

But representatives of those industries say that while they support the ban on real child pornography, any move to censor their products would be an unjustified restriction of freedom of expression. Daisuke Okeda, a lawyer and inspector for the Japan Animation Creators Association, said it was "natural that animation is exempted."

"The goal of the law itself is to protect children from crime," he said. "Banning such expression in animation under this law would not satisfy the goal of the law."

Okeda said that no studies have been done that prove any link between pedophilia and animation in Japan.

Hiroshi Chiba, the manager of Chiba Tetsuya Production, one of the country's best known manga production houses, said that more could be done in terms of age restrictions on graphic content featuring children and to distinguish it more clearly from other comics. And he admitted that some products of the industry leave him and his colleagues "disgusted."

"But rich, deep culture is born from something that might not be accepted by all," Chiba said. "We need to allow the gray zone to exist as a necessary evil."

'An international hub'

Some experts counter that children suffer in a culture that appears to tolerate images of child sexual abuse.

Hiromasa Nakai, a public affairs officer for UNICEF in Japan, pointed to the graphic content in manga, anime and some video games, as well as the "junior idol" genre of books and DVDs that display minors wearing tiny bikinis and striking sexual poses.

Japan should do more -- beyond the proposed law change -- "to protect the best interest of children," Nakai said.

Statistics show that child pornography remains a big problem in Japan.

The U.S. State Department's 2013 report on human rights practices in Japan labels the country "an international hub for the production and trafficking of child pornography."

It cited Japanese police data showing the number of child pornography investigations in 2012 rose 9.7% from a year earlier to a record of 1,596. The cases involved 1,264 child victims, almost twice as many as in the previous year.

The fact that possession remains legal, for the time being, "continued to hamper police efforts to enforce the law effectively and participate fully in international law enforcement," the report said.

Girls as sex objects

One local authority already took matters into its own hands. The prefecture of Kyoto in central Japan introduced a ban on possession of child pornography in 2011.

But Nakai said addressing the problems isn't just a matter for government, suggesting parents, the media, the private sector and even children themselves can play a role in improving the situation. The portrayal of young girls as sex objects in Japan has long raised eyebrows among Westerners.

An article in Wired in 1999 reeled off a list of examples in Tokyo: "Vending machines sell schoolgirls' used panties, which the girls sell to middlemen. 'Image bars' specialize in escorts dressed in school uniforms. Telephone clubs feature bored adolescent girls earning spending money by talking dirty. Sex shops sell a porn magazine called 'Anatomical Illustrations of Junior High School Girls.'"

Some experts suggest the situation is born out of Japan's long-established patriarchal society.

Whatever the cause, changing a culture may prove a lot harder than changing a law.

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